Sunday, August 28, 2016

TIME MACHINE: 1920, 1964, 1861, 1904.

(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


The Ocean City inlet that exists today was created during a 1933 hurricane but it wasn't the first time Mother Nature cut a channel from the Sinepuxent to the Atlantic.  With the benefits brought about by the creation of an inlet in 1920, why wasn't it maintained?

April, 1920



The Evening Journal (Wilmington, De.)


June, 1964



The Daily Times

October, 1861


. The Weekly Standard (Raleigh, NC)

July, 1904


Peninsula Enterprise


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .

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Saturday, August 27, 2016

White Marlin Controversy


(From The Dispatch in Ocean City)


Court Asked To Rule On White Marlin Open Controversy; Two Polygraph Tests Find Deception By Winners


Pictured is the 76.5-pound white marlin hooked on the second day of the White Marlin Open. Photo by Hooked On OC/Fish In OC

(Read the full article here:)

http://mdcoastdispatch.com/2016/08/26/court-asked-to-rule-on-white-marlin-open-controversy/

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

FRIDAY & SATURDAY SUMMER FUN ACTIVITIES!


***
 And there's more late summer fun on Saturday, 8/27, in Princess Anne with a free Bluegrass concert on the courthouse lawn from 3 to 5 p.m. featuring the popular Blue Crab Crossing band from Somerset County. Bring a blanket or lawn chairs. Food and beverages available.

Also on Saturday, beginning in the morning, the inaugural Great American Watermelon Blast..similar to fall Punkin Chunkin ..will be held in Vienna, Md. You can read more about this at:
http://www.myeasternshoremd.com/dorchester_star/news/article_298e19ba-efc9-5852-9877-c350c2fbdf15.html

Sunday, August 21, 2016

TIME MACHINE: SCOTT'S OCEAN HOUSE AT GREEN RUN BEACH

(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


August, 1906
(Democratic Messenger-Snow Hill, Md.)


Old Days at Scott's Beach


"Scott's Ocean House," situated on Green Run Beach, this county, was a pleasure resort of more than local celebrity some twenty five or more years ago. The late James Scott was its proprietor and conducted the same successfully and satisfactorily, until the advent of Ocean City, situated some twenty miles to the northward. When Ocean City was laid out, and a corporation, known as the "Atlantic Hotel Company" erected the Atlantic Hotel, which is even now the leading hotel of the place, "Scott's Ocean House," dwindled in importance, and it has never regained the prestige it enjoyed in former years.


What is known as "Scott's Ocean House" was situated on a shallow cove, making up from Synepuxent Bay, on the eastern side of Green Run Beach, just opposite the farm on the mainland known and called "Watermelon Point." From the year 1865 up to the year 1876 the place was decidedly on the boom. From a small beginning, Captain Scott having at first taken only a few summer boarders, he conceived the plan of erecting a large building for the accommodation of the public. This he did, and it was not long before the fame of the place had so extended that patrons began to pour down upon him, and he was obliged to erect another large building as an annex. Still, this was not sufficient to accommodate his guests, who, in order to secure rooms had to engage them weeks in advance. It is wonderful the distance a number of his guests hailed from, some coming every season from points in Ohio, and many from Wheeling, West Virginia. The then Catholic Bishop of Wheeling, with a number of his clergy, were accustomed to come to "Scott's Beach" every season, no other resort, whether in the mountains or on the seashore suiting them so well, they said. They found here in Worcester County, just what they wanted, viz., delightful bathing, a quiet retreat, rustic scenes, and nature in her simplest garbs. Many, also, were its patrons from Baltimore, Philadelphia and other large cities. The only place of any importance that competed with it in this particular section was "Coffin's Beach," on the mainland to the south of Ocean City, just in sight of the latter place. The reputation of "Coffin's Beach," as well as of the guests who most frequented it, was distinctly of a local nature.


Before the days of "Scott's Ocean House" a most distressing and heart rendering accident occurred near Coffin's Beach." It seems that what was known as a "bay party" was given by some people of Berlin and Whaleyville, and a number of young men and ladies, full of life and youth, drove gaily down one warm summer day, bent upon having a happy time. They danced and had refreshments, and, before departing, it was suggested that they take a bath in the bay. They entered the water with zest and lightness of heart, none of the party knowing what the future had in store for them. In a short time, two of the young ladies of the party were drowned. One of them was a Miss Connoway, a sister of the late H. Clay Connoway, of Berlin; the other a Miss Mumford, a sister of the late Mrs. James A. Ennis, of Snow Hill. Both of the young ladies were very young and popular, and the sad event cast a gloom over the entire community.


Very providentially, it would seem, there never was a serious accident of any kind to chronicle in the whole history of Scott's Beach, the untimely death of the late Dr. Ralph Purnell, of this town, did not occur until many years after the place had been abandoned as a summer resort. The death of this promising young man, just entering upon the threshold of life and his profession, was very much lamented.


It is very doubtful if there ever was more genuine, more real pleasure experienced anywhere, or by anybody, than by the patrons of "Scott's Beach." Since 1864 Snow Hill has had steamboat communications with Baltimore, and a few years afterwards the railroad was completed to Snow Hill, which was its terminus for many years. Down at "Public Landing[, Md.]" there was kept a public house, and the sloop "Fairfield," the late Captain Frederick Conner, commander, made regular trips from the pier at "Public Landing" to Scott's.


There was a regular line of hacks running from this town to "Public Landing," conveying passengers to and from Scott's. Our hotels did a good business, as did also the public house at the landing.


Those were happy days for the young people of that period, especially. If the old pier at Scott's could talk; if the old porticos, extending the full length of the house, had the faculty of memory and speech; if the sand on the ocean beach possessed the same gift, and chose to impart its knowledge, in the language of the late Horace Greeley, it would be "very interesting," and what tales of love between love sick swains and maidens would be unfolded! It was the custom in those days for the young people to go over in parties, chaperoned by some young married lady, and, whilst this was so, there was no selfishness or clannishness existing. All mingled with each other, each one endeavoring to make the other as happy as possible until the trip was at an end.


The young ladies were all sweet, pretty and attractive, as they are now; the young men were just as attentive and ardent in their wooings as they are now; the sun shone just as brightly as it does now; nature adorned herself then in just as pretty garbs as she does now, and everything went "as merry as a marriage bell."


The place was provided with a spacious hall for dancing purposes, with musicians, a ten pin alley, with a saloon adjoining, where something stronger than water could be obtained, although there was but little inebriety manifest and nothing done or said that could grate harshly on the most modest ears, or give offense to the most tender sensibilities. Perfect order prevailed, and was maintained throughout the history of the place. At sunrise the ox cart was brought around to convey the ladies with gentlemen escorts to the ocean for a bath. The merry party was obliged to traverse a road of a half mile or more before the ocean was reached. Bath houses were provided for both sexes. After a pleasant plunge in the surf, the return trip was made in time for breakfast, which consisted, for the most part, of trout, just caught and fried, together with all the delicacies of the season. It is doubtful if Ocean City, with all its magnificent hotels, its stores, shop, and all the surrounding country to draw from, could surpass Scott's, in the height of its glory, in all that constitutes good, substantial, solid living, and as a place for healthful and genuine recreation.


The arrival and departure of the sloop, "Fairfield," was a great event with the guests; some of whom went down to witness the departure, others the arrival, of friends, also to hear the latest news from home; for, be it remembered, there were no mails to and from the place, there being no post office or anything of the kind at Scott's. Rural Free Delivery was not conceived of in those days, and all correspondence was received at the post office in Snow Hill, to be delivered to the driver of the hack, who in turn delivered it to Capt. Conner. From Capt. Conner, the mail was handed over to Capt. Scott for distribution among his guests.


In addition to the patronage extended the place by our own county, the prominent families of Somerset, Wicomico and Dorchester counties were frequent habitues of the place, coming over in large parties and making extended stays thereto. The young people and others of our town and county were always, and "very much" in evidence at Scott's. The season usually opened about the 20th of June, and closed in the month of September. Many of the young men of those days have become prominent in the political, professional and business life of our county and state, whilst others have crossed the River and gone to the great Beyond, unlike unfathomed and unfathomable to mortal ken.


A great change has taken place at old Scott's, and the section adjacent thereto. In those days there were a great many inhabitants of Green Run Beach. The place was provided with a public school, which was well attended, and with a competent teacher. The advent of Ocean City completely knocked "Scott's Ocean House" out of business. There is now no one living there, or in the neighborhood, save the crew of the Life Saving Station. The windows of the old house have fallen out, and the place that was once the scene of so much fashion, dancing and gayety, has become the abode of bats, crickets and fleas. We have been much impressed recently with the silent gloom of the place. The very echo of the human voice, or footstep is sad, silent and mournful, and the last time we saw Scott's it made us feel like not wishing to see it again, until, at least, a complete rehabilitation should take place and restore it into something like its original self.


Bibliographic Information: "Old Days at Scott's Beach" Democratic Messenger (Snow Hill, Md.: August 18, 1906)



Another article (below) on Green Run Beach was published in a June, 1967 Wicomico County Centennial edition of The Daily Times in Salisbury.







Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .

When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.



Thursday, August 18, 2016

A Local Beach Resort From A Former Era.


"Old Days at Scott's Beach"- A 1906 local newspaper article recounted an earlier era, before the birth of Ocean City, when vacationers journeyed to a popular summer resort on Assateague Island, across from Public Landing.

Read about it this Sunday here at The Pocomoke Public Eye! 

Sunday, August 14, 2016

TIME MACHINE: 1960, 1898, 1942, 1943.

(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


February, 1960

The Salisbury Times


August, 1898



The Evening Times (Washington, DC)



January, 1942





1943



























































Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .

When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.


Thursday, August 11, 2016

Mosquito-Borne Virus

(As reported on wboc.com)

Sources of Mosquito-Borne Virus Found in Wicomico, Worcester Co.
Posted: Aug 10, 2016 3:02 PM EDT Updated: Aug 10, 2016 11:57 PM EDT

SNOW HILL, Md.- Public health officials in Wicomico and Worcester counties have identified two pools of the mosquito species that carry a virus that can be fatal to humans.

According to the Wicomico County Health Department, sources of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), were found last month in a rural part of Wicomico County and near Sheppard's Crossing in Worcester County.

The EEE virus is carried and transferred by Culiseta melanura mosquitoes in the same way that West Nile and Zika are spread, the health department said. Once someone is bitten by an EEE-infected mosquito, the incubation period ranges from four to 10 days. Symptoms can include chills, fever, joint and muscle pain and general discomfort, but some people do not show any symptoms, according to the health department.

The EEE virus can be fatal in roughly one out of every three infected people, and no direct treatment exists. People with milder illnesses typically recover on their own, although symptoms may last for several weeks. In more severe cases, patients often need to be hospitalized to receive supportive treatment, such as intravenous fluids, pain medication and nursing care.

Just like with other mosquito-borne illnesses, the most effective way to prevent EEE is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes. Use insect repellents and wear long sleeves while spending time outdoors, install or repair screens on windows and doors and remove standing water from your property. For more information on mosquito prevention, visit www.cdc.gov/features/stopmosquitoes/.

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Concert In The Park Reminder





Thursday, August 11, from 730-930p.m. at Cypress Park.

A Live Concert Experience: A Tribute to Adele featuring Pocomoke's Brittany Lewis.

Pack a picnic & bring your lawn chairs or enjoy bleacher seating with a beautiful view of the scenic Pocomoke River.

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

NASA'S NIGHT SKY SUMMER FINALE








NASA’s successful Astronomy and Night Sky Summer Series is coming to a close. Don’t miss out! The final and most exciting Astronomy Night will be held on Assateague Island, Virginia, August 12.


Unlike the previous two Astronomy Nights this summer, this night will feature the breathtaking Perseid Meteor shower. Join the fun, and gaze through some of Delmarva Space Sciences Foundation’s telescopes. Participants will take a closer look at Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Earth’s Moon, and uniquely this time—a meteor shower.


The event starts with an Astronomy 101 presentation at the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge Herbert H. Bateman Education Center Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Following this, from 8:45 to 9:45 p.m., participants will have the opportunity of observing the night sky through telescopes and binoculars located at the north end of beach parking lot #1.


“The two previous Astronomy Nights were very popular among locals and tourists alike, drawing in nearly 2,000 people!” said Kim Check, Visitor Center manager. “I would love to see an even bigger turnout for the Perseid Meteor Shower viewing.”

The event starts with an Astronomy 101 presentation at the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge Herbert H. Bateman Education Center Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Following this, from 8:45 to 9:45 p.m., participants will have the opportunity of observing the night sky through telescopes and binoculars located at the north end of beach parking lot #1.


“The two previous Astronomy Nights were very popular among locals and tourists alike, drawing in nearly 2,000 people!” said Kim Check, Visitor Center manager. “I would love to see an even bigger turnout for the Perseid Meteor Shower viewing.”


The event is free and open to the public. The Astronomy 101 presentation will take place regardless of weather. However, the telescope viewing is subject to cancellation due to inclement weather. Park entrance fees apply. 


This series is a collaboration between Assateague Island National Seashore, Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, Delmarva Space Sciences Foundation, and the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Visitor Center. 


The NASA Visitor Center, located on Va. Rt. 175, about six miles from U.S. Rt. 13 and five miles from Chincoteague, is open daily, from 10 AM to 4 PM. Admission is free.

For more information about the Astronomy and Night Sky Summer Series or the Visitor Center, call 757-824-1344 or visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wallops/visitorcenter

Samantha Kelly
Office of Communications Intern
NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility


Facebook For Seniors!

For those of my generation who do not and cannot  comprehend why Facebook exists:



I am trying to make friends outside of Facebook while applying the  same principles.

Therefore, every day I walk down the street and, if someone makes eye contact with me, I tell them what I have eaten,  how I feel at the moment, what I have done the night before, what I will do  later and with whom.

I give them  pictures of my family, my dog, and of me gardening, taking things apart in the  garage, watering the lawn, standing in front of landmarks, driving around town,  having lunch, and doing what anybody and everybody does every day.

I also listen to their response, give them the "thumbs up" and tell them I like them. 

And it works just like Facebook. 

I  already have four people following me: Two police officers, a private investigator, and a psychiatrist!


Sunday, August 7, 2016

TIME MACHINE: The Lower Eastern Shore's Past Recounted In 1899.

(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


September, 1899



The Morning News (Wilmington, De.)


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .

When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.

Friday, August 5, 2016

A Colorful Past On The Lower Shore


Back in 1899 a newspaper article recounted the contributions of previous generations to a colorful lower Eastern Shore history.  Read about it here this Sunday on The Pocomoke Public Eye's TIME MACHINE feature. 

Sunday, July 31, 2016

TIME MACHINE: 1957, 1893, 1984.


(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


July, 1957



The Salisbury Times



August, 1893



Peninsula Enterprise


1984


(Courtesy Vintage Ad Browser)


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .

When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.


Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Blessing Of The Combines



Please join us!
 

Saturday, August 6th, 2016 for Snow Hill’s 18th Annual Blessing of the Combines celebration in the downtown area on Green Street.  


Festivities begin on Green Street at 11:00 am with live music and street activities. The Parade of Combines sets off down RT 12 to Green Street at 11:15.  A “throttle thrust” will signal our master of ceremonies to begin the program with the presentation of colors by the award-winning Snow Hill High School Junior Marine Corps ROTC.  After recognitions, a keynote speaker and  the Blessing the afternoon’s lineup of selections featuring area musicians will begin.  

Children can visit a variety of animals at the Petting Barnyard; then hop aboard a wagon for the hay ride.  There will be a Children’s Barnyard of activities, and the popular Children’s Tractor Pull as well as  a Scales and Tales presentation from the Pocomoke River State Park and lots of olf fashioned children's activities and games.

There are opportunities for Craft Vendors along Bank Street, and Information Booths along Green Street.  Craft Vendors and area non-profits are encouraged to contact Diana Nolte at 443-944-4402 for space reservations or click here to download an application.

For additional details contact Becky Payne at 443-783-1715 or call or email Diana at 443-944-4402 or blesscombines@aol.com .


Sunday, July 24, 2016

TIME MACHINE: 1961, 1962, 1883, 1919.

 (Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


March, 1961



The Salisbury Times


July, 1962




The Evening Sun (Hanover, Pa.)



March, 1883




The Morning News (Wilmington, De.)


May, 1919


The Denton Journal


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .

When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.



Wednesday, July 20, 2016

FORMER CHIEF SEWELL INDICTED

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Check local news media, such as wboc.com, for latest updates.
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(Reported in The Baltimore Sun, Wednesday, July 20, 2016)

Former Pocomoke police chief, current Baltimore state's attorney contractor, indicted

A former Eastern Shore police chief who alleged racism after he was fired without explanation has been indicted on misconduct in office charges by the state prosecutors' office.
Kelvin Sewell, 53, a retired Baltimore Police homicide detective who now works for the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office, was indicted by a Worcester County grand jury Tuesday, court records show. The allegations stem from a November 2014 incident, the records show.
The Pocomoke City Council fired Sewell in 2015 and gave no justification for the move, saying it was a personnel matter. The dismissal divided the town of 4,000: Sewell, who was Pocomoke City's first black police chief, alleged it was retribution for him standing up for two black officers who complained about racism.
Sewell and the officers are currently suing city and county officials in federal court, alleging racial discrimination.

Sewell could not immediately be reached for comment, and details of the indictment also were not immediately available.
Pocomoke City Mayor Bruce Morrison did not respond to a request for comment about whether the investigation by the Office of the State Prosecutor was related to Sewell's firing.
Sewell's arraignment is set for next month.
The lawsuit against the city brought by Sewell and the officers remains pending, and alleges broad racial harassment in the town. The state attorney general's office, which is representing the city and county in the suit, has called the lawsuit an "absurd, meritless" complaint and an "attempt to extract some sort of undeserved windfall payout."
Sewell said he stood up for employees who had reported a racially hostile work environment, including officers watching "racially charged" videos in their presence and regularly using racial epithets.
Sewell filed his own complaint with the EEOC alleging that he was paid less than his white predecessor. The racial strife in the small town caused the case to be featured in the New York Times, and the officers filed suit with the help of the ACLU of Maryland.
Sewell is seeking reinstatement and back pay, along with damages.
In March, Sewell was hired by the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office as a contract employee investigating felony, homicide and violent crime cases, as well as helping to locate and interview witnesses.
Sewell spent more than 20 years with the Baltimore Police Department, retiring as a sergeant in 2010. His departure followed racially-charged allegations that a supervisor had ordered him to view a Ku Klux Klan web site after insisting the hate group was active in Sewell's home county.

Trimper's Unique Reputation


(Picture and article courtesy of The Dispatch, Ocean City) 



                                                                                   Photo by Chris Parypa


Trimpers Rides Confirmed As Country’s Oldest Family-Owned Amusement Park

(Likely Even The World’s)




OCEAN CITY — It should come as no surprise to the generations of visitors to Ocean City, but Trimpers Rides and Amusements at the foot of the Boardwalk is the oldest “family owned and operated” park in the U.S. and technically the world, a noted amusement park historian confirmed this week.
Two years ago, Trimpers was featured on a Fox Business News channel show entitled “Strange Inheritance” and it came to light the iconic park on the foot of the Boardwalk near the Inlet was likely the oldest family-owned amusement park in the U.S.
National Amusement Park Historical Association historian Jim Futrell was interviewed during the show and commented on the family’s ownership longevity. The Trimper family reached out to Futrell following the show’s taping and asked him to research the oldest amusement parks in the nation and across the globe and determine if his statements made during the “Strange Inheritance” show were verifiable.
“It came about when they were filming ‘Strange Inheritance’ and they interviewed Jim Futrell, who is an amusement park historian and has written several books and done extensive research on the subject,” said Trimper family spokesperson Brooks Trimper this week. “We followed up with him after the show and he did some research and confirmed we are the oldest ‘family-operated’ park in the nation and technically in the world.”
Futrell compiled the list and determined Trimpers was certainly the oldest family-owned park in the U.S. and made a strong case for the oldest in the world.
“As you see, Trimper’s ranks as the 24th oldest operating amusement park in the world, but in terms of family ownership, it ranks second to Blackgang Chine in England,” said Futrell. “So, you could safely say that no family in the U.S. has owned an amusement park longer than the Trimpers and still make the argument that it is worldwide because Blackgang Chine was not really an amusement park until well after Trimpers was.”
Trimpers currently ranks 24th on the list of the oldest amusement parks in the world, but first in the U.S. in terms of owned and operated by the same family and technically in the world. The Blackgang Chine Park opened by the Dabell family on the Isle of Wight in the U.K. is the oldest family-owned amusement park in the world on the list, but it began with Victorian gardens for visitors to the island and later a complete whale skeleton that founder Alexander Dabell purchased and bleached and reconstructed in the park as an attraction.
For decades, Blackgang Chine operated with the whale skeleton and other oddities. It wasn’t until after a family trip to the U.S. in the 1960s that the Dabells began adding amusement park rides in the traditional sense, according to Fentrell. Today, Blackgang Chine has evolved into a themed-part with different areas such as Dinosaurland, Frontier Land and Nursery Land, for example.
Again, there are older parks in the U.S. and around the world, but none has had the same family ownership and operation as the Trimpers. For example, the Lake Compounce Park in Connecticut was opened in 1846, but the current ownership group has only operated it since 2008. Iconic Cedar Point opened in Ohio in 1870, but its current owners have operated the park only since 1957. Coney Island opened in 1886, but its current owners have only operated the park since 1996.
There are others on the list in the U.S. that are older than Trimpers and have been operated by the same owner longer, but in each case they are owned and operated by the cities in which they are located. For example, just ahead of Trimpers on the list is the Columbian Park in Lafayette, Ind., which opened in 1892, but it has been owned and operated by the city of Lafayette from the beginning.
Trimper said he was pleased Futrell’s research confirmed Trimper’s as the oldest family-owned park in the U.S. and technically the world.
“We’re very excited to hear it,” he said. “Our family has a long history here and we like to believe our family is part of the reason Ocean City was established, not the only reason obviously, but we’ve been a big part of it for well over a century.”
Brooks and his brother, Chris, are now the fifth generation of Trimpers to operate the iconic Boardwalk park and at least that many generations of visitors have enjoyed the amusement park over the last 120 years or so.
In 2008, the park’s future was threatened when a highest and best use property assessment of the substantial waterfront site threatened to raise the property taxes substantially to the point the family had to consider a different use, but state and local officials worked with the Trimpers to resolve the issue. Brooks Trimper said this week there is no reason to believe the park will not continue to operate just as it has for the last century or so well into the future.
“There is nothing in the plans to change anything anytime soon,” he said. “We’re going to continue this as long as there are generations coming to enjoy the park. We’ve had generations of our family operating it, but more importantly, we’ve had generation after generation coming to enjoy the park.”
Daniel Trimper and his wife, Margaret, opened the park in 1893 with a pair of hotels and a handful of amusements. In 1900, after a severe storm, Daniel Trimper rebuilt the Sea Bright Hotel and modeled it after the Windsor Castle in Great Britain and the two hotels coupled with the growing amusement park became known as the Windsor Resort.
In 1912, Trimper’s purchased the massive carousel that still operates today from the Herschell-Spillman Company in New York. The massive carousel is 50 feet in diameter and was driven by a steam engine in the early days. The unique carousel features 45 animals including, of course, a variety of horses, but also includes a menagerie of other animals such as a cat, dog, frog, rooster, deer, goat, lion, tiger, ostrich, pig and dragon, for example.
Over the years, the Trimpers added numerous rides in the historic indoor portion of the park and several have historical significance, including the smaller carousel and the kiddie Ferris wheel, which date to the 1920s. In the 1950s, the Trimper family began adding outdoor rides and the pace of expansion increased through the 1960s with new rides being added nearly every year. One of the most popular rides in the park, the double-loop Tidal Wave roller coaster, was added in 1985 and has become a fixture on the downtown skyline.

Sunday, July 17, 2016

TIME MACHINE: 1908, 1940, 1969.


(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


September, 1908



The Daily News (Frederick, Md.)



January, 1940





The Daily Mail (Hagerstown, Md.)




June, 1969


The Daily Times (Salisbury)



Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .


When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.


Saturday, July 16, 2016

Former Bay Ferry Still In Service


(Picture and article courtesy shoredailynews.com)



Ever get nostalgic about riding the Chesapeake Bay Ferries?

One of the ferries that formerly plied the waters between Kiptopeke and Cape Charles is still in service. The ferry Virginia Beach was put in service by the Virginia Ferry Commission in 1959. The Virginia Beach was a converted World War II LST that was used originally in the invasion of Normandy. Along with the Pocohontas, Delmarva, Old Point Comfort and the Princess Anne, the Virginia Beach was sold to the Cape May Lewis Ferry Company in 1964 after the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel opened.

The Virginia Beach was renamed the Cape Henlopen and served on that route until the mid seventies according to Captain Richard Belote, a former captain of the Princess Anne and a long time employee of both the Virginia and Delaware ferries. At that time the ferry was sold to the Cross Sound Ferry Company to run between New London Connecticut and Oient Point on the northern tip of Long Island New York where she continues to serve today.

The Cape Henlopen is the only original ferry from the fleet to survive. The Pocohontas, Delmarva, Northampton and Old Point Comfort were scrapped, the Princess Anne is now a fishing reef off of Palm Beach Florida and the Accomac was being refurbished to send to the Amazon River when she caught fire in a Norfolk shipyard and was declared a total loss. All of the older ferries were of mid 1930s or 1940s vintage with the Accomack being rebuilt from the old Virginia Lee to accommodate automobiles only.

The Cross Sound Ferry Company apparently intends to continue to use the Cape Henlopen for a while longer. A photo on their web site shows the boat in dry dock in 2009 where she received new engines.


Monday, July 11, 2016

Summer Series At Wallops

Astronomy & Night Sky Summer Series

Save the Dates: July 14July 21, and August 12



The NASA Wallops Flight Facility Visitor Center and its 
partner the Delmarva Space Sciences Foundation, will 
kick-off the Astronomy and Night Sky Summer Series at 
Assateague Island, Virginia starting Thursday, July 14.

Each event will begin with an Astronomy 101 
presentation at the Chincoteague National Wildlife 
Refuge Herbert H. Bateman Education Center Auditorium
 at 7:30 p.m. followed by night sky observations through 
telescopes and binoculars located at the north end of 
beach parking lot #1.

Discover the night sky through observations of Saturn, 
Jupiter, Mars, Earth’s Moon, clusters and galaxies. The 
series will continue on Thursday, July 21 and Friday,
 August 12. The Perseid meteor shower will be the focus 
of the event on August 12 when it is at its peak.

This series is a collaboration between Assateague Island
 National Seashore, Chincoteague National Wildlife
 Refuge, Delmarva Space Sciences Foundation, and the
 NASA Wallops Flight Facility Visitor Center.

The event is free and open to the public. The Astronomy 
101 presentation will occur regardless of weather,
 however, the telescope viewing is subject to 
cancellation due to inclement weather. Park entrance 
fees apply.