Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Spring Day Trips Scheduled

Something to think about for this Spring!

The Worcester County Recreation And Parks Department has announced its Motorcoach Tour program of day trips for this Spring with trips scheduled to the Philadelphia Flower Show on March 8, to Washington, DC on April 4, and to New York City on April 23.

For more information about these family friendly day trips visit:

http://www.worcesterrecandparks.org/programs/motorcoach


Tuesday, February 2, 2016

QUESTION FOR READER


Will the Pocomoke Public Eye reader who posted the below comment please email me?  I have a question. Thanks!

tkforppe@yahoo.com


(1/28/16)
"I have a photo of George Hack (my uncle) on stage with Dick Clark at that teen hop! on At The Hop! -Mary B"

Sunday, January 31, 2016

TIME MACHINE

"Friendliest Town On The Eastern Shore."  Our tradition runs deep.  Excerpt from a letter to the editor from a visitor to Newtown, (former name of Pocomoke City) published in the Baltimore Sun, April 28,1847.

This place (Newtown) is a pretty snug little village, containing about 500 clever and hospitable inhabitants; it has good wide streets, quite clear of that "eye sore," known mostly over the Peninsula by the name of "deep sand"; the houses, though built of frame, are generally built substantially and with some discretion and taste; there are two neat, new, and quite handsome frame churches in it; as for the merchants of the place, suffice it to state that they are very clever and hospitable.  F. Mezick, Esq., the landlord with whom I stopped, and his very obliging and jolly assistant, are richly deserving of a passing notice, for the good treatment and the extension of the many civilities to "the stranger."


(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)

April, 1952..





(The Star-Democrat, Easton)





Memories of Steamboat Days
Myra Lorene Boggs. "Memories of Steamboat Days" Peninsula Enterprise (Accomac, Va.: July 5, 1956)

(Part 2)

Cedar View, formerly called "Buzzard Hill," was a steamboat landing further down on Nandua. There must have been some kind of landing here many years ago. It was at this place a July 4th celebration ended in tragedy — one person was killed by a cannon shot — a terrible storm came up and several persons were drowned. Nandua was more than a playground for children. It was one of the biggest shipping points on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. I've known as many as two boats to load here in a day — and still leave vehicles (carts, wagons and a few trucks) in line for a quarter mile out the road waiting to be unloaded.

Principally the cargo was sweet potatoes or Irish potatoes. They were truly the "good" old steamboat days.

Among the boats serving this area regularly were the Maggie, built in 1869; the Helen, built in 1871; the Tangier, the Pocomoke, the Tivoli, the Maryland, and others. But the best loved of all was the grand old side-wheeler, the Eastern Shore. It was on the Eastern Shore, while studying music in Baltimore, I made seventeen trips in seventeen weeks.

On Occohannock Creek were Concord Wharf, Davis Wharf, Reed's (now Morley) Wharf, Shields Wharf and Rue's Wharf. Each landing had its share of freight and passengers. On certain trips the steamer "laid over" at Rue's Wharf for the night, starting early next morning for the return trip to Baltimore, touching at various landings on its way.

Some of the boats would make early morning landings in Onancock Creek at Onancock, Finney's Wharf and Mears — then go on up the Pocomoke River, making different landings and "lay over" for the night at Pocomoke.

Coming and going practically all the boats stopped at Crisfield, where there was usually a good cargo of seafood, quite a number of passengers and in the summer, a great many mosquitoes.

Other stops along the route were Tangier Island, Ford's Wharf and Deal's Island.

During the time of the Eastern Shore Steamboat Co., Mr. T. A. Joynes was the purser on the Eastern Shore. Later, he was Supt. of the B. C. and A. He was a most agreeable host to travelers, as was Mr. Frank Battaile and many acting as pursers, as well as the different captains and various others, including Mr. Foster the night watchman and Mr. Ned Brittingham (now living in Pitts Wharf area), who left steamboating, to go back to the Alaskan Yukon in search of gold. Everyone on the boat, deck hands and waiters, were faithful to their trust and did all in their power to add to passenger comfort and pleasure. Not the least of these was Jonah Bradford, a colored man, who for many years was head waiter.

Often when there was an extra supply of cold watermelon, ice cream or some other eatables, a group of us would enjoy a late night snack.

If the boat was not too crowded — some of us would dance, or perhaps gather around the piano and have an informal song fest. Yes, for the most part, it was like a big family party on a pleasant outing.

As Mr. Leaverton stated the food was excellent, well served, everything in abundance and price for dinner was 50 cents. The boats were kept spotlessly clean. Many Baltimoreans made the round trip just for pleasure.

Amid the pleasant memories there are some sad ones. The Eastern Shore made an annual excursion to Old Point. It was a delightful daylight ride. Many family groups carried lunch, but as usual, they served excellent food. We reached Old Point in late afternoon, spent the evening there as we pleased and left Old Point about midnight.

Dick Johnson had been a deckhand for many years. He was jolly, quite good natured and liked by everyone. On one of these excursions, while the boat was docked at Old Point Dick was helping someone up the gang-plank. There was no rail, Dick lost his balance, fell overboard and was drowned.

Another sad incident was the burning of the Tivoli and later the Maryland. Still another was the drowning of a handsome young officer from Fairmount, Md. The boat was stopped to help some men who had been stranded and were in danger in a small boat. They were saved but in helping to save them Nivette Mires was drowned. A colored man of our locality was a deckhand on the Tivoli and the Maryland. He helped to save many passengers, and he, so far as I know, is still living.

I could relate many happy instances of these long gone steamboat days, but I must stop someplace.

The Eastern Shore Steamboat Co., the B. C. & A., the Maryland, Del. & Va., the B. C. & O. — all gone. Their day finally ended in 1932.

The old steamboat landings have, for the greater part, gone to decay.

The men, too, who owned or frequented their places have long since passed away.

Trucks take our produce to markets.

Compared to former years, nothing is the same.

Traveling by automobile is very nice but the trip to Baltimore can never be as when the steamboats came.

I hope the readers who knew these lovely steamboat trips will enjoy this little bit of reminiscing as I have the writing.
 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~



"Civil War Profiles: The Battle of Cockle Creek near Chincoteague "  


See article at:





Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .


When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.


Friday, January 29, 2016

The MarVa Theater - A Community Icon

For many years, the MarVa Theater in Downtown Pocomoke has been a staple in the community. It is a great example of how people can come together for a common interest for the good of the community. And that pride and mission still rings true today. The theater has gone from an empty, rundown, condemned building to a thriving and economical movie and live theater with an emphasis on our community in which we live. As an example, a summer theater academy to teach kids the ins and outs of theater and acting, as well as home to many community outreach events and a place where people can all come together and enjoy each others company. All of the staff and volunteers there become like a family, and just like in a family there's always struggles, it's not always the easiest to deal with, especially when pressure arises, but that is when a family pulls together even more. But even in the struggles the theater is thriving with events such as the Valentine's Cabaret coming up in February. And the growth at the theater is remarkable, and I'm convinced it's going to continue to be that way. The heart of the staff and volunteers at the MarVa is unlike anything I've ever seen before, and through the good and bad times, they all pull together for a common purpose, our community in which we live, work, and serve in. From someone who has been involved for several years at the MarVa, trust me when I say the future is brighter than ever before and I'm looking forward to what is in store. So keep an eye out, because a lot is happening in this small community with the theater. I'm going to leave you with this thought, the MarVa may be a small community theater in a small town, but all of the staff and volunteers there have a big heart for our community. We are there because we love it and we are going to continue to thrive!

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

MARVA THEATER IN THE NEWS..



Anyone have info regarding an issue involving a member of the Marva Theater Board Of Directors not being reappointed?

Please comment.

Sunday, January 24, 2016

TIME MACHINE

"Friendliest Town On The Eastern Shore."  Our tradition runs deep.  Excerpt from a letter to the editor from a visitor to Newtown, (former name of Pocomoke City) published in the Baltimore Sun, April 28,1847.

This place (Newtown) is a pretty snug little village, containing about 500 clever and hospitable inhabitants; it has good wide streets, quite clear of that "eye sore," known mostly over the Peninsula by the name of "deep sand"; the houses, though built of frame, are generally built substantially and with some discretion and taste; there are two neat, new, and quite handsome frame churches in it; as for the merchants of the place, suffice it to state that they are very clever and hospitable.  F. Mezick, Esq., the landlord with whom I stopped, and his very obliging and jolly assistant, are richly deserving of a passing notice, for the good treatment and the extension of the many civilities to "the stranger."


(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


November, 1961


 (The Salisbury Times)



Memories of Steamboat Days
Myra Lorene Boggs. "Memories of Steamboat Days" Peninsula Enterprise (Accomac, Va.: July 5, 1956)

In the Sunday Sun Magazine of June 17, 1956, there was an article, "I remember — Old Eastern Shore Steamboat Landings" by G. H. Leaverton.

Steamboat days were a part of my life. Though I did not know the steamboat landings in Mr. Leaverton's area, I thoroughly enjoyed the article. It brought back memories of the steamboat days on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. I agree with Mr. Leaverton, "The world held no greater adventure for me" — and for many other children and adults — "than a trip to Baltimore on the steamboat, and if steamboats were still running" — I and many others — "would still regard these trips with the same excitement and enthusiasm."

Unfortunately or otherwise — this steamboat traffic was swallowed up in the progress of the years. Folk living in this area today have missed something beyond description, their elders greatly enjoyed. My memory goes back a little further than Mr. Leaverton's.

Previous to steamboat days, my father and his five brothers had a Bay and coastal trade in sailing craft. Their uncle was one of the best known pilots in coastal and ocean travel. I was born and am still living at Nandua beside the river Nandua. With this background and having always lived near the water, naturally, I inherit a love for watercraft and their times.

First of all I'll go as far as I can trace my memory and stories passed on by my elders — to the early steamboat days on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

Capt. George Raynor made the first trip from Cape Charles to Old Point on the steamer Old Point. From Capt. Raynor or some other source, I've been told that prior to this, Capt. Raynor, in charge of the steamer Old Point, touched at landings in lower Northampton County, including Hungars, en route to Baltimore. There may have been landings in Accomack County, but I have not been able to verify this.

Before this time, the coming of the Sue into Pungoteague Creek, where Martin's Wharf was the principal stop, created quite a sensation. Before the Sue there was a little junket of some kind, but I do not recall the name.

The Sue was built in 1867.

My mother, then a young lady, lived on the North Shore of Pungoteague Creek, a little west of the present Harborton. I've heard her tell of the Sue, for its time a seemingly floating palace, and of the excitement, as in later years, whenever the steamboat arrived at different landings. I'm not sure if Hoffman's Wharf was in existence in Sue's time. It eventually became Harborton as it is now.

Also, on Pungoteague Creek is Dock View on an original grant to the Hutchinson Family. That has always been called "Dock View". At this time "Dock View" is used for loading pulp wood. It was originally built as a landing for sailing craft; was at one time the site of a fish factory and has in its day been a steamboat landing.

Evans Wharf and Boggs Wharf were other landings on Pungoteague Creek. The water was not too deep near Boggs' Wharf. The officials said a steamboat could not land there. My uncle, Capt. Frank Boggs, insisted it could. He persuaded them to let him try it. He took over the wheel, brought the craft up the stream, turned the steamboat around and made the landing without a hitch.

The wharf at Nandua was a part of our home property — and only several hundred yards from the house. In my childhood the shore line was of beautiful hard sand. Between the water's edge and the road to the wharf was a wide stretch of white sand. This is now grown up in grass and the shore is muddy. In former years the children of Nandua gathered here and built villages of sand houses, some of them with hallways big enough to crawl through. When the steamboat came to the wharf all the children would go to the shore and jump the waves.

(Conclusion of this article next Sunday)



This is how Walmart started.. Sam Walton's first store in 1962.




Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .



When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.




Friday, January 22, 2016

TRAVEL ALERT


The lower Eastern Shore may escape the heavy snow that's forecast for other areas within our travel range but please reconsider any plans for traveling during this weekend's predicted storm.


Maryland State Police News Release

Snow Emergency Plans For All Counties Beginning Friday At Noon


For Immediate Release
Contact: SHA Office of Customer Relations and Information (410) 545-0303
                                                                  MSP (410) 653-4200

MARYLAND STATE POLICE AND STATE HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION
TO DECLARE SNOW EMERGENCIES FOR ALL COUNTIES
BEGINNING FRIDAY AT NOON
Snow Emergency Plan Restricts Parking on Snow Emergency Routes and
Permits Maryland State Police to Tow Vehicles
(January 21, 2016) – The Maryland State Police and Maryland Department of Transportation’s State Highway Administration (SHA) are proactively announcing that snow emergency plans will go into effect at noon Friday in advance of the predicted severe storm expected Friday and Saturday.  The Statewide Snow Emergency requires vehicles restricts traveling on all highways designated as snow emergency routes be equipped with chains, snow tires or all season radials.  Additionally, special hauling permits for commercial vehicles are not valid during snow emergencies.

The snow emergency plan also allows the Maryland State Police (MSP) to call tow companies to remove abandoned vehicles in the road or on the shoulder and restricts all parking on designated snow emergency routes.

“It is important for all Marylanders to heed Governor Hogan’s warning about the coming storm and to make every effort to refrain from travel through the weekend,” Maryland State Police Superintendent Colonel William Pallozzi said.  “Implementing the snow emergency plans in every county is an indication of the serious nature of this storm and the statewide impact it will have.  Our goal is to keep citizens safe and this is one of the many steps we will be taking to do that.”

Significant snowfall, high winds and treacherous driving conditions are expected from late Friday, all day Saturday and into Sunday.  If forecasts materialize as expected and more than two feet of snow falls, cleanup will take several days and extend into early next week.

“Please avoid traveling during the storm to allow our crews the space needed to plow the roads,” said SHA Administrator Gregory Johnson. “Our goal is to keep one travel lane open and passable on major highways for emergency vehicles during the storm and focus on plowing all lanes once the snow stops.”

Commercial vehicle drivers have the option to wait out the storm at one of Maryland’s 17 designated safe haven ridesharing lots in order to avoid travel during hazardous conditions.

SHA maintains the numbered roads in Maryland’s 23 counties with the exception of toll roads (i.e. the ICC, I-95 north of Baltimore City, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, Fort McHenry Tunnel etc.)  Click here to obtain information for county roads departments.

MD511 provides tools that you can use for traffic information, weather conditions, or traffic information.  Customers may also follow SHA on Twitter @MDSHA and “like” us on Facebook.

###

Sunday, January 17, 2016

TIME MACHINE.. Franklin City, 1890.

"Friendliest Town On The Eastern Shore."  Our tradition runs deep.  Excerpt from a letter to the editor from a visitor to Newtown, (former name of Pocomoke City) published in the Baltimore Sun, April 28,1847.

This place (Newtown) is a pretty snug little village, containing about 500 clever and hospitable inhabitants; it has good wide streets, quite clear of that "eye sore," known mostly over the Peninsula by the name of "deep sand"; the houses, though built of frame, are generally built substantially and with some discretion and taste; there are two neat, new, and quite handsome frame churches in it; as for the merchants of the place, suffice it to state that they are very clever and hospitable.  F. Mezick, Esq., the landlord with whom I stopped, and his very obliging and jolly assistant, are richly deserving of a passing notice, for the good treatment and the extension of the many civilities to "the stranger."

(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


In its day Franklin City was a bustling Eastern Shore town..a major oyster shipping center for the east coast. But that began to change with the opening of the Chincoteague causeway in 1922. Franklin City's economic decline along with erosion spurred by mother nature has virtually erased all evidence of the once thriving community. 

But this was the Franklin City of a bygone era.


May, 1890
The Sun (New York)

Curious Virginia City

BUILT ON STILTS IN AN ACCOMACK SALT MEADOW.

Much Wealth Amid Odd Surroundings -- The Tide Cleans the Streets -- Water from Beneath the Sea -- The Wild Fowl.

FRANKLIN CITY, Accomack, Va., May 6. --
For time out of mind before the year 1877 the extreme northeast corner of the State of Virginia had been the possession of the Franklin Family. It was not a very valuable corner as seen by the observer. There was a narrow strip of low-lying arable land, nowhere more than ten rods wide, a half a mile wide salt marsh, and then the bay, not named on the maps, but now called Jinkatig Bay by people hereabouts because Chincoteague Island lies in the bay and Jinkatig is the way they pronounce the name of the island. But though of little value as dry land, the Franklin estate under water was a possession worth owning, because the bay affords some of the finest oyster planting beds to be found anywhere, and for more than 200 years the people of Virginia peninsula have resorted to the natural beds found there for oysters.

Since the days of reconstruction following the war the system of planting seed oysters has been adopted with great success, and up to the year 1877 already mentioned hundreds of sloop loads of oysters gathered in that bay were every year carried out to sea and away to the great oyster market, which in those days could be found at the East River and Broome street, New York, but now is situated in two blocks along North River at West Tenth street. It was a great business even then, but subject to one drawback that it does not now suffer from. In those days the sailing vessels were often becalmed or got aground for just a long enough time to spoil the oysters, and the cargo was lost, for there was no marine insurance business around the bay.  In 1877, however, the oyster business got a lift. Capitalists who owned lines of railroad on the peninsula saw the sloop and schooner traffic in oysters and with covetous eyes, and eventually surveyed a route from Harrington, Del., down along the coast to a point on old Judge Franklin's swamp in the northeast corner of the State of Virginia. The Judge welcomed the railroaders, and in consideration of their locating the proposed road there gave them half his swamp.

Thereupon the track was laid and a pier built into the bay from the edge of the swamp. The track across the swamp was laid on a cow trestle. Then a few piles were driven in the swamp at the shore end of the pier, a little one-room shanty was brought down the road on a flat car and set upon the piles, and then, in honor of the former owner of the marsh, it with the pier, was named Franklin City. The boom in Franklin City was on from that day, for Judge Franklin at once laid out his part of the marsh in building lots and sold them for improvement. On an average two houses have been built there every year since, and none has been destroyed. Franklin City now contains nearly two and a half score of houses but it is only fair to say that the larger part of them has been erected within three years.
Franklin City is one of the oddest cities to be found anywhere, it is a city set on stilts. Every house stands on piles, and is from three to four feet above the surface of the ground. There is a huge frame hotel that towers above the surrounding houses like a bay barn above a cow shed on a New York farm. There are two avenues and two cross streets, ungraded and unworked, of course.

There are houses, including one dwelling built on piles out over the bay. There are pig pens and stables set on piles like the dwellings, and elevated board walks run from the houses to the outbuildings. A dozen of the dwellings are low, neat cottages. The rest are shanties of various sizes. But the one most notable characteristic of the place is the oyster shell. The railroad where the low trestle once stood is ballasted with oyster shells. Looked at on a hot day, as it lies gleaming white on dark green marsh, the roadway is enough to five a nervous man the headache. The bulkheads along shore are filled in with oyster shells. The more enterprising citizens are gradually making land by filling in their lots with oyster shells, and by and by, where now only walks on piles are found, there will be substantial, but not-to-be-cultivated land.

There is neither sewer nor drain in Franklin city, but for two very good reasons, a doctor is rarely called for. One reason is that, whenever a southeast gale rages out at sea, and the ocean is piled up on the long sea wall, called Assateague Beach that keeps the waves from rolling in on Franklin City, the tide rises so high that Franklin City gets a bath. The tide sweeps across the lots and through the streets and flushes them out. The other reason is that the drinking water is excellent. Some of the wells are sunk in the bay itself, and sweet water is drawn up so to speak, from the bottom of the sea. They use driven wells, and every well draws water in an inexhaustible quantity from sixty feet below the surface.

Equally interesting with the city are its people. They are a curious mixture of Jersey and Maryland families. Every soul there is more or less directly connected with the oyster business, save only the trainmen employed by the railroad. The men dress in long-legged rubber boots, twilled cotton overalls, and jackets, sou'westers, which they wear on their heads at this season with the flannel or lining side out. They are all expert boatmen, boat builders, and sail makers; they can and do tong, dredge, and cull oysters to a man. They wear their beards full, their faces are red, their hands hard, and their manners bluff. They never lock their doors at night, because there is not a man there who would steal money, though they do say that unaccountable mistakes are made when gathering the oyster harvest, by which under-water farm lines are crossed and the reaper gathers where he did not sow. The women dress in calico and they wear sun bonnets made of the same low-priced material. They are a handsome lot, however, old or young, calico or no calico.

To look at the people, men and women, as they go about the streets, a stranger would say they were a contented lot of laborers working at a dollar a day or thereabouts. Their dress and their homes are about like what may be found among American laborers in New England villages.

But let the stranger go into the store of Postmaster Bill Gibbs after the passenger train arrives at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, and watch the distribution of the mail. It is an astonishing mail for such a looking town. A dozen men in their rough clothes are awaiting it, and the letters are passed over the counter as they answer their names. They open the envelopes, which have the names of well-known wholesale oyster dealers in New York and Philadelphia printed on the corners and from half of them out drop checks and statements comforting to look upon. When the mail has been delivered and the men have hurried away, a talk with Mr. Gibbs shows that for a dozen men who have been there in brown-twilled overalls and long-legged boots, the average income is not far from $7,000 a year.

Franklin City does not grow, because its sole source of income is now fully developed. Every inch of ground that can be planted to oysters is now occupied. There is but one chance for an addition to its population, and that would be but a fleeting addition. The waters of the bay and the creeks about here swarm with wild fowl in the season, and the traveler who leaves New York city at 9 o'clock in the morning gets here early in the afternoon. New York sportsmen might buy a patch of marshland and build a club house on it and, coming here at anytime between Nov. 1 and April 1, have no end of sport. Canvasbacks are scarce, but red heads, black heads, geese and brant well make up for the lack. Then there are the flocks of quail back in the country and from April 1 well on into June snipe and shore birds in quantities fit to make a sportsman's hair curl. The fishing in the bay, too, is superb, the catches of weakfish with hook and line often running into the hundreds. It is a land of low prices for home products, and the sportsman even of slender means who could not enjoy life here is not worthy of his title.

A Curious Virginia City 
Spears 
John R. 
Sun 
New York 
May 7, 1890


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .


When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.


Friday, January 15, 2016

Second Community Meeting Scheduled

CITIZENS FOR A BETTER POCOMOKE
COME OUT AND JOIN US FOR THE SECOND COMMUNITY MEETING OF THE 2016 NEW YEAR

THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2016 7:00pm SHARP
NEW MACEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH
SIXTH AND YOUNG STREETS
POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND
** Try to be prompt and bring a friend

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Meeting Highlights


Monna Van Ess of Citizens For A Better Pocomoke reports this information from the January, 11 Community Meeting: 

Sheila Nelson will be running for the Council seat for District 1.  Also, a suggestion was made to form a volunteer group to save the Armory (old police station) and make it a war museum. 


Sunday, January 10, 2016

TIME MACHINE.. 1845, 1946, 1931.

"Friendliest Town On The Eastern Shore."  Our tradition runs deep.  Excerpt from a letter to the editor from a visitor to Newtown, (former name of Pocomoke City) published in the Baltimore Sun, April 28, 1847.

This place (Newtown) is a pretty snug little village, containing about 500 clever and hospitable inhabitants; it has good wide streets, quite clear of that "eye sore," known mostly over the Peninsula by the name of "deep sand"; the houses, though built of frame, are generally built substantially and with some discretion and taste; there are two neat, new, and quite handsome frame churches in it; as for the merchants of the place, suffice it to state that they are very clever and hospitable.  F. Mezick, Esq., the landlord with whom I stopped, and his very obliging and jolly assistant, are richly deserving of a passing notice, for the good treatment and the extension of the many civilities to "the stranger."

(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


1845..  A writer's view of the lower Eastern Shore.








April, 1946 (Time Machine archive)

School news reported by students in the "PHS Speak's" column in Pocomoke's Worcester Democrat newspaper included items about a month long competition among home room classes for cleanest rooms...the annual Commercial Day program under the direction of Miss Mary Emily Matthews...an Easter Party being planned by Miss Pearl Bratten's 5th and 6th grade classes...a victory garden project under the direction of Mrs. Wilson...a fried chicken dinner for faculty and Chef Club members, directed by Miss Mable Jones...the organization of an Aviation Club to make model airplanes and collect information about important flights, under the direction of Mrs. Mae Taylor...and the organization of a Camera Club under the direction of Mrs. Cutright. 

1931.. Look what's new.





Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .


When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.

Friday, January 8, 2016

The Return Of WBOC Radio

Something old is new again.

When the company that owned WBOC television and radio sold the stations in 1980 WBOC radio..on the air for 40 years at that time.. was purchased by a separate owner.

 A new radio era is now underway for WBOC with the launching of its 102.5 FM station from the very studio that was once home to radio personalities such as Lanny Layton, Geoge Hack, Tom Maguire, and Ralph Pennewell . 

Complimenting the music and live local DJ's will be the resources of the WBOC-TV news and progamming departments. 




(WBOC photo.)

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Meeting Scheduled


         CITIZENS FOR A BETTER POCOMOKE 

COME OUT AND JOIN US FOR THE FIRST COMMUNITY
 
MEETING OF THE 2016 NEW YEAR

THERE WILL BE A BIG ANNOUNCEMENT MADE BY

 PRESIDENT RONNIE WHITE

JANUARY 11, 2016, 7:00pm SHARP

   NEW MACEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH

SIXTH AND YOUNG STREETS

POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND
 
** Try to be prompt and bring a friend 

Monday, January 4, 2016

UPCOMING POCOMOKE EVENTS


Friday, January 8
7:00pm
 Movie at the MAR-VA Theater
Saturday, January 9
7:00pm
 Movie at the MAR-VA Theater
Friday, January 15
6:00pm
 Night at the Museum
Saturday, February 6
5:30pm
 Wine Making Workshop
Friday, February 12
6:30pm
 Valentine Cabaret
Limited seats available for the Valentine Cabaret. Call early for tickets 410-957-4230 or visit marvatheater.com .  For details on any of the avove events visit:
  



Friday, January 1, 2016

Sunday, December 27, 2015

TIME MACHINE ... New Year's.


"Friendliest Town On The Eastern Shore."  Our tradition runs deep.  Excerpt from a letter to the editor from a visitor to Newtown, (former name of Pocomoke City) published in the Baltimore Sun, April 28,1847.

This place (Newtown) is a pretty snug little village, containing about 500 clever and hospitable inhabitants; it has good wide streets, quite clear of that "eye sore," known mostly over the Peninsula by the name of "deep sand"; the houses, though built of frame, are generally built substantially and with some discretion and taste; there are two neat, new, and quite handsome frame churches in it; as for the merchants of the place, suffice it to state that they are very clever and hospitable.  F. Mezick, Esq., the landlord with whom I stopped, and his very obliging and jolly assistant, are richly deserving of a passing notice, for the good treatment and the extension of the many civilities to "the stranger."


(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


1884.. The railroad becoming a reality in Worcester County took a big step forward on New Year's day when ground was broken for the railroad bridge at Pocomoke City.

1905.. On New Year's day patients were to be transferred to the new $90,000 Peninsula General Hospital building.

1941.. Town Tavern in Pocomoke City had Slim Marshall's Orchestra for informal New Year's Eve dancing; 75-cents per person admission.

1964.. The Carousel Hotel in Ocean City had a Gala New Year's Eve party including party favors, buffet, bottle of champagne, breakfast, and an oceanfront room for $42.00 a couple.

1966.. Choppy Layton and Wayne Powell were masters of ceremonies at a New Year's Eve "Chop Hop" at the Pocomoke armory, with music by the Midnight Walkers.

1966.. The New Years Eve party at Twin Towers south of Pocomoke City featured dinner for two, cocktail, music by Greg Sterling, breakfast, and motel room for $25.00 a couple. 


January, 1903..

                                                             




The Topeka Daily Capital (Topeka, Kansas)


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .


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Saturday, December 26, 2015

TIME MACHINE ... This Sunday's Preview

Local notes on New Year's Eve/New Year's Day from years past, and Thomas Edison's predictions for the new year 1903.

It's this Sunday right here at The Pocomoke Public Eye!

Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .


When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

TIME MACHINE ... Christmas.

"Friendliest Town On The Eastern Shore."  Our tradition runs deep.  Excerpt from a letter to the editor from a visitor to Newtown, (former name of Pocomoke City) published in the Baltimore Sun, April 28,1847.

This place (Newtown) is a pretty snug little village, containing about 500 clever and hospitable inhabitants; it has good wide streets, quite clear of that "eye sore," known mostly over the Peninsula by the name of "deep sand"; the houses, though built of frame, are generally built substantially and with some discretion and taste; there are two neat, new, and quite handsome frame churches in it; as for the merchants of the place, suffice it to state that they are very clever and hospitable.  F. Mezick, Esq., the landlord with whom I stopped, and his very obliging and jolly assistant, are richly deserving of a passing notice, for the good treatment and the extension of the many civilities to "the stranger."

(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)


December 24, 1897 (Time Machine archive)
Woodland Daily Democrat (Woodland, California) 

              




December 25, 1924 (Time Machine archive)

The Lubbock Morning Avalanche (Lubbock, Texas)

(Excerpts) 

Childhood's Christmas Memories

"Backward, turn backward, Oh Time in your flight, Make me a child again just for tonight."

How many of us tonight are wishing that old poem might come true just once more in our lives?  Of all the days in our childhood, none stand out so vividly in our memory as those mysterious Christmas times.  There is something about our Christmas memories that reach the heart of every one of us who were so fortunate as to grow up in a happy home.  We did not say a big, luxuriant home, but a HAPPY HOME.  A home where sympathy and LOVE, and a family understanding of one another's hearts fills the atmosphere of the whole home.  A home where each member of the family believes in and rejoices with every other member of the family in their ambitions and their hopes and their accomplishments.  That's the kind of home we mean when we say a happy home.  It may be a humble little cottage or it may be a mansion.  It is the spirit in the house and not the shell in which we live that makes happy homes. And it so happens that most of our happy homes are humble homes because we have so many more humble homes in America than any other kind.

What are your first memories of Christmas?  Can you bring them back through the long years and tell them over again to the children?  There is nothing children love to hear so well as Christmas stories of their own fathers and mothers. "What did Santa Claus bring you when you were a little boy Daddy?"  "And what did he bring to mother?"  "Did he travel then just as he does NOW?  And what kind of toys did little girls and little boys send for in those days?"  

It is the unusual, the impossible, and the mysterious belief that it will happen that puts the thrill of expectancy into the heart of the little child at Christmas time.  It is their faith in the spirit of Santa Claus that is so beautiful.

But if the memories of Christmas time in the old home far away are among our most treasured memories of childhood, what is our greatest privilege at Christmas time now?  Is it not storing up other Christmas memories in the lives of our children to be recalled a generation from now when we are no more and other little ones yet unborn are begging for Christmas stories of long ago?  This is one of our greatest opportunities and privileges for Christmas, 1924.  Creating Christmas stories and Christmas memories to be retold by the generations of fathers and mothers in 1950, 1975, and even up to 2000 after the first Christmas story was ever produced.

...fill the childish hearts and childish minds around you with those Christmas memories you would be proud and happy to have them carry through their lives and tell over and over at the Christmas tides of the future to the little heads nestled near their hearts.


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .

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Thursday, December 17, 2015

TIME MACHINE ... This Sunday's Preview.

Journeying back to the Christmas' of 1897 and 1924.

It's this Sunday right here at The Pocomoke Public Eye! 


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .


When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.

Sunday, December 13, 2015

TIME MACHINE.. Old Christmas Catalogs

"Friendliest Town On The Eastern Shore."  Our tradition runs deep.  Excerpt from a letter to the editor from a visitor to Newtown, (former name of Pocomoke City) published in the Baltimore Sun, April 28,1847.

This place (Newtown) is a pretty snug little village, containing about 500 clever and hospitable inhabitants; it has good wide streets, quite clear of that "eye sore," known mostly over the Peninsula by the name of "deep sand"; the houses, though built of frame, are generally built substantially and with some discretion and taste; there are two neat, new, and quite handsome frame churches in it; as for the merchants of the place, suffice it to state that they are very clever and hospitable.  F. Mezick, Esq., the landlord with whom I stopped, and his very obliging and jolly assistant, are richly deserving of a passing notice, for the good treatment and the extension of the many civilities to "the stranger."

(Reader-friendly viewing of news archives/historical archives material)

Thumb through the pages of Christmas catalogs from the 1930's through the 1980's! Here's your link:

http://www.wishbookweb.com/



1885.. Letter From Santa



(Peninsula Enterprise)


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers or something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? Please send to tkforppe@yahoo.com .



When you're clicking around the Internet remember to check in with The Pocomoke Public Eye.  We strive to be a worthwhile supplement to your choices.