Showing posts with label Recreation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Recreation. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Tickets For Summer Fun!




Amusement Park Tickets

Discounted Amusement park tickets are on sale at the Worcester County Recreation Center for the 2016 Season.  You can purchase your tickets before heading out of town to save your family some money and time waiting in ticket lines.  Tickets are available for Busch Gardens, Diggerland USA, Dorney Park, Dutch Wonderland, Hershey Park, Kings Dominion, Sahara Sam's, Sesame Place, Six Flags America, Six Flags Great Adventure & Water Country.
Contact: Lisa Gebhardt for more information at 410-632-2144 x2500 or lgebhardt@co.worcester.md.us.

Monday, June 8, 2015

For Summertime Fun!




Discounted Amusement Park Tickets on Sale at Worcester County Recreation Center


Amusement park tickets can now be purchased at the 
Worcester County Recreation Center in Snow Hill at a 
discounted price! Purchase your tickets before heading 
out of town to save your family some money and time
waiting in ticket lines.

We offer tickets to all of your favorite Mid-Atlantic parks. 
Busch Gardens, Diggerland USA, Dutch Wonderland, 
Hershey Park, Kings Dominion, Sahara Sam's, Six Flags
America (MD), Six Flags Great Adventure (NJ), and 
Water Country tickets are all available. 

All ticket prices are discounted below the price you
would spend purchasing the tickets at the gate. Tickets 
can be purchased Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m.; cash only. 

Visit our website at www.WorcesterRecandParks.org for 
a complete list of prices. For more information and 
availability, contact Lisa Gebhardt at (410) 632-2144 ext. 

Saturday, June 1, 2013

OCPD Reminds Citizens of the New Skateboarding Rules

Ocean City Police would like to remind citizens of the changes to the skateboarding rules during the summer season. On October 1, 2012, Ocean City Mayor and City Council approved an amendment to the town’s skateboarding ordinance. Since then, skateboarding is permitted on the boardwalk during the same times as bicycling.

While skateboarding is still prohibited throughout the rest of the city with the exception of the skate park, skateboarders now have another option.

Beginning on the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day, skateboarding is permitted between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. of the same day. During Springfest and Sunfest (Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday), skateboarding is permitted between 2:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. of the same day.

Outside of the summer season, skateboarding is permitted on the boardwalk with no time restrictions.

OCPD reminds skateboarders that stunts and tricks are still not allowed on the boardwalk.

Anyone with questions about the skateboarding amendment should call OCPD at 410-723-6610.

Submitted:
Ocean City Police Department

Monday, July 25, 2011

Attorneys Don A Different Kind of Suit

There have often been stories written about attornies and judges who race vehicles or  ride Harley Davidson motorcycles and now surf!
Written by
Greg Latshaw
OCEAN CITY -- Before prosecutor Richard Brueckner puts on his suit and enters the Wicomico County courtroom, he's out on the water, wearing his wet suit.

Richard Brueckner, left, and Wicomico State's Attorney Matt Maciarello pose with their surf boards/ LAURA EMMONS/THE DAILY TIMES


Brueckner, the safe streets prosecutor for the State's Attorney's Office, rises early to surf at Assateague Island. Hours later, he trades his board for a legal pad, taking on cases that put drug dealers and gun offenders behind bars.

Brueckner's not alone -- he's one of many lawyers who surf the waters near Ocean City. The activity brings together attorneys who may spar in court, but are friends when their boards dip into the water.

"You're sort of in a communion with nature," Brueckner said. "When you see all the surfers on boards, waiting for the surf, that's called the 'lineup.' We're talking to each other. The sun is coming up, the dolphins are going by."

Riding the waves is also a popular pastime for professionals such as accountants and doctors. But peers in those fields don't have the fierce rivalry of the bar. In court, duty calls a defense attorney and prosecutor to pick apart each other's cases.

But at the beach, saltwater melts away animosity. The surfboard breaks down barriers and builds friendships.

From boards to the board room

Long before Matt Maciarello was the Wicomico County State's Attorney, he was a Dover kid yearning for the waves.

His first job was at Endless Summer Surf Shop in Ocean City. He fixed broken surfboards, which figures, in a way, because Maciarello's first board was a beat-up, finless 1968 Dewey Weber.

As a teenager, Maciarello competed in local and regional competitions, winning nearly two dozen trophies. Decades later, he still surfs, occasionally paddling beside defense attorneys. Two weeks ago, he took Tim Robinson, a first sergeant with the Wicomico County Sheriff's Office, out for a lesson.

"It's the modern board meeting," Maciarello joked.

On a given Saturday morning, defense attorneys, prosecutors and public defenders will be in the water together. At one point, Wicomico County District Court Judge L. Bruce Wade surfed, but he doesn't anymore.

Salisbury attorney Bruce Anderson said surfing brings people together. Anderson, 57, began surfing about 15 years ago as a way to get closer to his son, a surfer who travels around the world for waves. Now Anderson is part of a loose-knit group called the 62nd Street Longboarding Club, which brings together many older lawyers who surf off the street of the same name in Ocean City.

"I always say out there, 'It's not the guy who's the best surfer, it's the guy having the most fun,' " Anderson said.

Surfers turned lawyers

Greg Coburn, a defense attorney with an Ocean City practice, said he's been surfing since the summer of 1967, long before he became a lawyer. Once, Coburn lived in Hawaii for eight months, catching the big waves by day and working as a bartender by night.

Coburn, now 64, remembers his time in the Pacific fondly.

"We had it made. We had good jobs, were young and surfed," Coburn said.

Coburn said it was fellow Ocean City attorney Richard Parolski who introduced him to surfing. When they were younger, the two worked as seasonal police officers in Ocean City, an experience that gave them a chance to hide their boards under a hotel and surf the waves off Eighth Street.

"I surfed long before I was a lawyer. If you like it, you keep doing it," Coburn said.

He tries to surf several times a week on his longboard. When he's in the water, he said it doesn't matter if the person is a prosecutor or a defense attorney, just as long as they don't drop in on his wave.

Brueckner, the Wicomico prosecutor, agrees.

"They may be defense attorneys, but if they surf, they're OK with us," Brueckner said.

Thursday, July 1, 2010

Chincoteague Island Makes America's Best Beach Towns

As the summer season starts, finding the perfect beach for sunbathing and splashing in the surf becomes a national pastime, even obsession. But what happens off the sand is just as important. While we all hope that the sun will shine every day of our vacation, it's good to know there are options if the skies open up. These ten towns are classic Americana and are packed with museums, shops, and other rainy-day diversions, plus lots of fun festivals and outdoor activities if you want to do something more active then turning the pages of the latest chick-lit release (did someone say mini-golf?). So come along and tour America's best beach towns from the California Coast to the tip of Cape Cod. Just remember to pack the sunscreen.





10. Huntington Beach, California










9. Kennebunkport, Maine









8. Traverse City, Michigan










7. Cape May, New Jersey










6. Boca Grande, Florida










5. Cannon Beach, Oregon










4. Pismo Beach, California











3. Provincetown, Massachusetts










2. Rockport, Texas










1. Chincoteague Island, Virginia
This tranquil landfall off Virginia's coast is famed for the feral Chincoteague ponies that roam nearby Assateague Island. Every July since 1925, the Pony Penning and auction floods the town with tourists there to watch the ponies gallop down Main Street. This area is a nature-lover's nirvana all year round, though, with Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and the





Assateague Island National Seashore, home to herons, bald eagles, and woodpeckers. If the weather is keeping you from visiting the birds' natural habitat, the Refuge Waterfowl Museum exhibits extensive wildlife murals, skipjack boat models, and wildfowl woodcarvings by renowned decoy crafters like carver-in-residence Delbert "Cigar" Daisy. Victorian inns and ice cream parlors, clam shacks serving Chincoteague oysters, and beachfront BBQs complete the Norman Rockwell picture.

Tip:
Watch rocket launches at the NASA Visitor Center at the Wallops Flight Facility where Science on a Sphere Theatre projects 3-D effects on a suspended six-foot-diameter globe, depicting the moon, Jupiter storms, and Earth as seen by astronauts.

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Fee Increases To Get On Beach


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the daily entrance fee to the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge will increase from $5 to $8 on July 1. The price of the weekly, refuge annual, interagency annual and senior passes will not change. All passes are accepted at both ends of Assateague Island.

The additional revenue will be used to offset the maintenance costs of beach parking facilities and safety services on the Virginia end of Assateague Island National Seashore, as well as additional costs of visitor service projects.

Eighty percent of all money collected from the passes with the exception of the Federal Duck Stamp remains at the refuge to be used for visitor services and facility improvements. In 2009, the refuge utilized recreation fee dollars for repairs on the historic Assateague Lighthouse, annual maintenance of roads, trails, beach parking lots, visitor safety services (lifeguards), fee collection, and law enforcement support. These are some of the many projects that your fee dollars have provided.