Showing posts with label Local History. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Local History. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Old photo's revelation..


Our post of a few weeks ago about Pocomoke City's late mayor, movie operator, and radio personality J. Dawson Clarke mentioned that early in his career Dawson was a professional photographer.  I was aware of the photography only because of his signature on photo portraits of me and my sister. Thanks to Marc Scher for sending us the following.- tk

We had this picture framed in the store for years. I was always curious about the finer details of what the picture was for my dad really didn't know why or when the picture was taken. I decided to get a nicer frame and when I took the picture out I saw Dawson Clarke's stamp on the back of the picture. This all happened a month after he passed away.



(picture width reduced from original for posting)




Marc also shared this recollection about Dawson's Saturday morning radio broadcast:

I remember as a young child going to the radio station on Saturday mornings with my older brother. I must have been seven or eight years old. Dawson would have drawings for free passes to the movies. I won a free pass. But dealing with my older brother, he forced me not to tell our parents because we would get money for the movies anyway and could buy more candy. Sure enough we never told them and took the money to buy the candy. Being a small town news travels fast. Our parents found out and of course we paid for it when we got home.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Deserving Title


He could have been called "Mr. Pocomoke City."  It's on this Sunday's Time Machine here at The Pocomoke Public Eye!

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Why Sand?



In April, 1942 the Snow Hill mayor and city council voted to have dry sand hauled and distributed to the town's residents. This wasn't due to any environmental issue but in response to a very serious concern.

Read about it on this Sunday's Time Machine here at The Pocomoke Public Eye.  

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

History Event In Crisfield

From The County Times, Crisfield

Gravesite of Crisfield’s early settlers to be stabilized, public invited to hear lectures on local history



Joe Paden and UMES students in 2016 worked to restore the Nelson Homestead family cemetery off Cash Corner Road. On Saturday, March 25, they will be back stabilizing another small cemetery, this time on Calvary Road. The public is especially invited for the talks about local Native American history, genealogy and lore which begin at 10 a.m. The program is free, but donations will be accepted.

CRISFIELD — On Saturday, March 25, Joe Paden of the historic preservation group and tour guide outfitter, The Crisfield Story Project, will be leading a cemetery restoration of “Nelson’s Plot” located at 3075 Calvary Road in Crisfield. The restoration will be carried out by volunteers consisting of students and staff from the UMES Office of University Engagement and Lifelong Learning.

The Nelson Plot is the family cemetery of John Nelson, son of Revolutionary War Veteran, Thomas King Nelson, and grandson of Sacker Nelson who was kidnapped during that war to pilot the British fleet up the Chesapeake Bay. Mr. Paden will be sharing stories of this and other families throughout the day.

At 10 a.m., Native American expert, Norris Howard, chief of the Pocomoke Indian Nation will be giving a lecture and presentation on Native American life in the area. He will be followed by historian and genealogist Philip Goldsborough who will be covering the colonization of the Eastern Shore along with other interesting episodes in our history. Genealogist Linda Paden will also be present to answer questions pertaining to the histories of local families.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

This Was A Big Event!

An estimated 25,000 people attended this Sunday afternoon event in Salisbury in the winter of 1959. It wasn't an entertainment or sporting event, nor a religious, or political event.  There was nothing for sale nor items brought in for exhibit purposes. What was the attraction?



Any guesses?

The answer on this Sunday's Time Machine posting here on The Pocomoke Public Eye. 

Thursday, August 18, 2016

A Local Beach Resort From A Former Era.


"Old Days at Scott's Beach"- A 1906 local newspaper article recounted an earlier era, before the birth of Ocean City, when vacationers journeyed to a popular summer resort on Assateague Island, across from Public Landing.

Read about it this Sunday here at The Pocomoke Public Eye! 

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Worcester CCC Camp




A recent comment regarding the old CCC Camp between Pocomoke City and Snow Hill:
RangerJ said...
For more information on the CCC camp located near Milburn's Landing, see http://milburnccc.weebly.com

The site is more a repository for facts and guesses than a real website but it does have a couple of photos, including an undated one of the whole crew at one point in time.

If you do visit the site, especially if you have some facts or memories to share, please use the respond button near the top right of the page.
I am interested in hearing stories about the camp, identifying enrollees, and seeing photos.




(Time Machine posting from October, 2015.)

January, 1935 (Time Machine archive)
(The Titusville Herald- Titusville, Pa.)

LIFE IN CCC CAMP

Editor Of The Herald.

Dear Sir:-  I am a CCC boy and my home is in Diamond, Pa. My folks and friends take The Titusville Herald and (I) would like to have you publish this letter.  You may send me a copy of it.

My temporary home is now in the CCC Co. No. 1318 S-62 Snow Hill, Md.  I enlisted on October 8, 1934 for a period of six months, was sent to Fort Meade, Md., for a medical examination and a few simple army and camp instructions.

I was kept at Fort Meade for six weeks and later sent here to my temporary home.

This camp is located in amongst large pines of varying heights, 100 to 150 feet, and off the state highway about 1/2 mile, between Pocomoke City and Snow Hill, Md.

We have a good outfit here, the best in the third corps area, with 250 boys. Life here is different than on the outside.  It builds up the boys physically and mentally. Every day is something different, so we get some experience here that was never done on the outside,- from dish washing down on the line to cutting trees in swamps and changing clothes after falling in a swamp hole.  Therefore, we are being prepared for everything that gets in our way in the line of work and play.

I am in the CCC going on four months and like it quite well, except for dish washing which I get for Sunday K.P. about twice a month, which means standing over a big tub  3 x 3 x 4 feet, filled with water and soap, standing there for three solid hours except for about a half hour or so of gold bricking, washing 250 plates, knives, spoons, forks, cups and bowls, not to mention what other boys on K.P. have to do with greasy pots and pans.  I mean its fun if you take it that way.

Although we get plenty to eat, some outsiders say that we are being fed too well, for some of the boys look like as if they were over fed.  It isn't the eats, its the G.I. grease.  It gives us strength and health, with lots of fresh air, which we need to cut down those pines which are of varying heights.

Our work here consists of cutting down defective trees, clearing away underbrush, and building fire trails.

One thousand acres of state forest land here have to be cleared and it will take the rest of our two months to put a kink in it. Most of the boys are excellent workers and are rated according to their work.  Now, I mean when we work, it's work.   

We ride to work on trucks and to see us coming resembles a funeral.  Five stake body trucks and ten dump trucks, all loaded with men.  We ride to work and back for we have 1 1/2 miles to go.

We work 40 hours a week, 8 hours a day, rain or shine. Saturday afternoon and Sunday we get off.  Saturday morning until noon we have to work in camp.  In camp- scrub barracks floor, wash clothes, clean windows, stoves and arrange our clothing for inspection.  After dinner is dress inspection.  We line up in front of the U.S. flag on the parade grounds, stand at attention until the captain O. K.'s our dress.  Then we are free to roam anywhere until 6 a. m. Monday morning.  We have to sign in the recreation hall on a book when we come back or leave camp, so as to keep tally on us.  Anyone leaving camp without signing out gets extra duty of 72 hours in the kitchen as K. P.

Monday mornings we must all be in camp.  Reveille is at 6:45 a.m.  The sergeant in the barracks yells out , "crawl out, boys, and push on the mops."  We have to mop the floor every morning besides Saturday, make our bunk, and eat chow at 7 a. m. 7:30 a. m. we polish up the camp area, pick up all match sticks,  paper and cigarette stubs that have been thrown away carelessly over Saturday and Sunday. 8 a. m. call for work detail, line up and be on our way with axes and saws, to the wood, ready to do work and fill the woods with the ringing of the saws and and echoes of our axes, until 4 p. m., when the days work is done.

Hurrah for the CCC, for every boy is a man when he leaves.

Now friends, if you doubt what I've said come down to Co. No. 1318 S-62 CCC Snow Hill, Md., at your own expense and find out.

Your CCC friend,

Steve J. Brenner 

Sunday, August 28, 2011

TIME MACHINE ...


Anticipating Hurricane Irene material will be of most interest, the TIME MACHINE items that were scheduled to be posted today have been rescheduled for next Sunday.

Growing up in Pocomoke City in the 1950's Hurricane Hazel in 1954 stands out as the storm I most remember.

Stay safe everyone!



Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers.. such as a big snow storm, a favorite school teacher, a local happening, something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? It can be just a line or two or more if you wish. Your name won't be used unless you ask that it be. Send to tkforppe@yahoo.com and watch for it on a future TIME MACHINE posting!

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

TIME MACHINE ... More On Earthquake Shocks In Eastern Shore History!



(The following news items appeared in The Denton Journal in Denton, Md)

September 4, 1886

At a few minutes before ten o'clock on Tuesday night the whole area of the Eastern and Southern States was violently shaken by an earthquake. The prohibition meeting held in the Masonic Hall in Denton was just closing and several persons felt the shock. Clocks were stopped, hanging lamps swung, and doors thrown open by an invisible force. In Denton, it lasted about a half minute and the wave like motion was felt by a great many families. Reports from all sections show that the shock was general, reaching from New York to the Gulf. (The newspaper went on to report that Charleston, South Carolina had a dozen shocks with more than 50 fatalities and several hundred injured.)



October 6, 1888

A Cambridge dispatch reports that a very perceptible earthquake shock was felt in Dorchester County a few days ago.


December 23, 1899

Two distinct earthquake shocks were felt in this county.


May 12, 1906

An earthquake lasting several seconds badly frightened residents of Seaford Tuesday, but no damage resulted. The ground quivered, buildings trembled and windows shook as though they would fall out. Earth tremors were also felt by some people here on Tuesday, it is said. Several shocks were reported in several part of New England on the same day.





TIME MACHINE ... 1886 Eastern Shore Earthquake!

Fortunately, earthquakes on the Eastern Shore are few and far between.

The following item is from GHOTES (Genealogy And History Of The Eastern Shore Of Virginia..
www.ghotes.net ):

"In 1886 there was an earthquake on the Eastern Shore. On August 25th all clocks stopped at 9:53pm. At Craddockville ornaments on mantles were knocked to the floor and broken."



Sunday, August 14, 2011

TIME MACHINE ... The World War II Era on the Eastern Shore.


December, 1941

Pocomoke City and other other Eastern Shore residents were tuning in to a special statewide radio broadcast "WHEN THE BLITZ COMES KNOW YOUR TASK." A newspaper ad advised that officials will tell you what an enemy attack will mean to Maryland..to you..to your family..and what your part will be when that time comes. Front page news items such as Approaches To Bay Mined By Navy and Eastern Shore Guardsmen On Active Service reflected the worrisome news of that era.



June, 1941

In Crisfield the normal peacetime production at the Briddell plant was now involved with a heavy workload related to military needs with two work shifts required. Also in Crisfield two tent factories were working overtime to fill military orders.


February, 1942

World War II military action was reported close to home for Pocomoke and other lower Eastern Shore residents with the news that an enemy submarine torpedoed and sank a freighter just 23 miles off of Ocean City. Two died in the attack and 39 who spent seven hours in two of the freighter's lifeboats were rescued by a Coast Guard Cutter dispatched from Ocean City.


March, 1942

A complete blackout of Ocean City was ordered by Maryland's State Defense Council until a plan could be devised to prevent light reflections that could silhouette ships on the ocean. Army officials had previously called for the blackout to make it more difficult for enemy ships to spot and sink ships off the Ocean City coastline. One problem was said to be the glare of light from side streets in addition to the light along the immediate shoreline. Ocean City officials were meeting with state and federal officials and were said to be confident plans could be put into place that would not curtail the summer season.


March, 1942

The executive director for Civil Defense for Maryland issued a warning to all county defense directors that every Eastern Shore county must immediately put partial blackouts into effect every night until further notice. It would involve eliminating lighting on all advertising signs, store window displays and other such lighting that could not be controlled at once in the event of an alert. Full scale black out procedures and practices were developed in most of the bigger Eastern Shore communities during the war era.


October, 1942

Worcester County war rationing boards were created in Pocomoke City, Snow Hill, and Berlin. Pocomoke board members were R. Harlan Robertson, chairman; E. Russell Mathews, and Edward Ham. Additionally, B. Fuller Waters was appointed to the Ceiling Price Panel; and Rev. John A. Ditto, Verlin C. Krabill Sr., and William H. Dryden were appointed to the Fuel Oil Panel.

Citizens throughout the country were urged to give support and cooperation to their local rationing boards:

It may seem like a lot of "stuff and nonsense" when your local War Price and Rationing Board makes a decision. But- please remember that these board members don't make the rules.

Even OPA in Washington doesn't decide what is to be rationed. Gasoline restrictions--for example, were ordered by the War Production Board and your Petroleum Administrator.

Your Ration Board members are merely representatives of Uncle Sam. They are to see that everyone gets a Fair Share of Rationed Goods Available.

"Share And Share Alike!"- that's the motto of your War Price and Rationing Board!.

These members- patriotic neighbors of yours- are handling the toughest job in town. They work long hours, Without Pay, so please give them consideration. They're patient with you. Be patient with them.

A public service campaign attempted to explain gasoline rationing:

Why can't I get more gasoline?

Sorry- But we haven't enough gas here in the east to supply military and civilian demands now!

Well, we want to drive to our cabin every Sunday.

But that's pleasure driving.

Well. . .

And there Isn't Gas Enough for Pleasure Driving. Everyone in the east is entitled to at least 3 gallons every two weeks- and no more.

Oh, that's just one of those silly OPA rules. My sister in Indiana gets more gasoline than that!

Yes. If she has an "A" card, they give her 4 gallons a week. You see that's the maximum allowed to "A" drivers because our rubber situation is so critical throughout the country.

Well, if they have more gas in Indiana, why don't we get more of it here?

Shipping- that's why. Before the war, gasoline was shipped to the Atlantic seaboard in giant tankers. A tanker docked at an east coast port every 80 minutes. Now- these tankers are carrying gasoline and oil to our men on the fighting fronts.

Why don't they ship gasoline across the country?

They do. You'd probably be surprised if you knew how much your government is doing to bring gasoline east. They're using everything they can find. Tank cars- and even rubber-lined box cars. But we still can't get enough.

I thought they were going to build some sort of pipelines.

They have. But they haven't even produced enough for military needs!

I don't see why. Everybody gets such a little bit of gasoline!

Millions of gallons of gas and oil are used each week in our military industries. And millions of barrels are shipped weekly from our east coast ports to the battle fronts.

I never though of that before.

Most people don't. But if everyone would try to understand the reason behind rationing, I'm sure they would do everything they could to help.

You mean- the gasoline I don't get is helping to win the war?

That's right. And the more we have to fight with, the sooner we'll win.


Even in wartime there were some moments of a less serious nature:

1943

As a young Navy pilot former President George H.W. Bush trained at the Chincoteague base. As reported in various published accounts he flew low over an area of Crisfield where a circus had setup nearby and a frightened elephant broke away, in turn frightening nearby residents. Reports were that Bush's low fly-over was an attempt to impress a young Crisfield woman he had met at a USO dance at Chincoteague.


Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers.. such as a big snow storm, a favorite school teacher, a local happening, something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? It can be just a line or two or more if you wish. Your name won't be used unless you ask that it be. Send to tkforppe@yahoo.com and watch for it on a future TIME MACHINE posting!

Saturday, August 13, 2011

TIME MACHINE Preview ... The World War II era on the Eastern Shore


The war brings concerns and changes to life on the Eastern Shore. A glimpse of some of these.. tomorrow on The Pocomoke Public Eye!

Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers.. such as a big snow storm, a favorite school teacher, a local happening, something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? It can be just a line or two or more if you wish. Your name won't be used unless you ask that it be. Send to tkforppe@yahoo.com and watch for it on a future TIME MACHINE posting!

Thursday, August 11, 2011

TIME MACHINE Preview ... The Word War II Era On The Eastern Shore


The war brings concerns and changes to life on the Eastern Shore. A glimpse of some of these.. this Sunday on The Pocomoke Public Eye!

Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers.. such as a big snow storm, a favorite school teacher, a local happening, something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? It can be just a line or two or more if you wish. Your name won't be used unless you ask that it be. Send to tkforppe@yahoo.com and watch for it on a future TIME MACHINE posting!

Sunday, August 7, 2011

TIME MACHINE ... The Lighter Side!

October, 1943

"Gone With The Wind" was playing at Pocomoke City's Fox Theatre. Admission for all seats was 55-cents.


August, 1953

The Pocomoke Drive-In Theatre, two miles south of Pocomoke City on Route 13, was advertising $1.25 a carload admission with opening night features.. Jeff Chandler in Bird Of Paradise, and Fred MacMurray in Smokey, two big features every night. "No Need To Dress Up - Come As You Are- Bring The Entire Family" -- "Enjoy Movies In Your Own Car - Eat- Relax- Smoke"


January, 1975

"The Sting" with Paul Newman and Robert Redford was playing for six nights at the Marva Theatre in Pocomoke. Admission: Adults $1.50, Children 75-cents.


July, 1896

(Peninsula Ledger)

Dr. W. H. Walters, Surgeon Dentist, Pocomoke City, MD. prepared to do all kinds of dental work, and guarantees satisfaction. Teeth extracted without pain by the use of ---troas Oxide Gas or Cocaine. Crown and Bridge Work a Specialty. Prices Moderate.
----
The cheapest place to get your Spectacles and Eyeglasses is at Wm. Sartorious. Eyes tested free of charge.
---
W. Ulysses Schoolfield, Surveyor, Pocomoke City, MD. special attention paid to adjusting disputed lines.


December, 1972

In a "Scratch Pad" column about Salisbury's old water standpipe, Daily Times editor Dick Moore included the following:

We got a postcard from the Rev. R. Cephia Perdue of Pocomoke City who recalled hearing the great orator, William Jennings Bryan, speak on that very site in 1897. He (Bryan) was a candidate running against President William McKinley. The standpipe was not there then. But in 1908 the Rev. Mr. Perdue recalls going with a cousin, A.W. Perdue, to the standpipe and the latter climbed to the top of it.

Footnote: A.W. Perdue was the father of Frank Perdue of poultry industry notoriety.


January, 1941

(Abilene Reporter-News [Abilene, Texas])

Pocomoke City, Md., Jan. 1-
(AP)- It's been a mild winter, but two local residents hadn't figured as too unusual until:

Young Billy Ross and Clifton Dennis, out hunting with new Christmas rifles, bagged a three-foot, nine-inch allegator- about as common in Maryland as patting a polar bear.

The gator is believed to have escaped from a circus visiting here last year.



Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers.. such as a big snow storm, a favorite school teacher, a local happening, something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? It can be just a line or two or more if you wish. Your name won't be used unless you ask that it be. Send to tkforppe@yahoo.com and watch for it on a future TIME MACHINE posting!

Thursday, August 4, 2011

TIME MACHINE PREVIEW ... The Lighter Side!

Some items from the lighter side of Pocomoke City's past are coming your way this week. Take a look this Sunday on The Pocomoke Public Eye!

Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers.. such as a big snow storm, a favorite school teacher, a local happening, something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? It can be just a line or two or more if you wish. Your name won't be used unless you ask that it be. Send to tkforppe@yahoo.com and watch for it on a future TIME MACHINE posting!

Sunday, July 31, 2011

TIME MACHINE ... The Wild, Wild East!

January, 1911

(The Washington Post)

FEARS FOR HER LIFE

Mrs. J. L. Sturgis Of Pocomoke City
Asks For State Aid.

RECEIVES BLACK HAND LETTER

Wife of Bank President, Ordered to Leave $100 "Under Doorsteps," Calls Upon Thomas Ewell, State Fire Marshal, for Protection- Friends of Men Sent to Jail Suspected.

Special to The Washington Post

Baltimore, Jan. 23- Fearing that life and property are in danger, Mrs. John L. Sturgis, of Pocomoke City, Md., wife of the president of the national bank of that town, has appealed to State Fire Marshal Thomas Ewell for protection.

Col. Ewell received a letter from Mrs. Sturgis yesterday, including a missive written in a disguised hand, and which Mrs. Sturgis believed was sent to her by "Black Handers." The letter reads:

"Mrs. Sturgis: You are here bye notified to leave $100 under the door steps Sunday night or you died with all property burnt."

Factions in the Town.

A skull and crossbones were roughly drawn under this, while the name "Secretary" was signed to the note. Mrs. Sturgis found the note under the door last week, and has been very much frightened ever since.

Col. Ewell is of the opinion the letter was sent by friends of the five men who were sentenced to jail about a month ago on charges of arson, at his instance. Pocomoke City, he says, is divided into two factions, and one of the factions is continually annoying the other. The incarcerated men belong to one faction, while Mrs. Sturgis lives in the part of the town where the other faction is located.



August, 1923

There was concern in Pocomoke City that at least several of six escapees from the Eastern Penitentiary in Philadelphia had been retained by lawless bootleggers to terrorize Pocomoke citizens. The escapees had reportedly been seen in the Pocomoke area while at the same time there was an increase in threats and fires around town. The home of Rev. J.R. Bicking, one of the leaders of a citizens committee waring against the bootleggers and crime, was burned. Many Pocomoke City citizens were carrying guns, raising prospects that there would be a clash between the vigilantes and the bootlegging lawbreakers.


October, 1923

(The Tyrone Daily Herald [Pennsylvania])

Barn Wrecked By Explosion

Pocomoke City, Md., Oct 11- Bootlegging vengeance was in evidence here again when another building was totally wrecked, this time the barn of Sylvester Messick, a retired lumber merchant, living on Walnut Street. A terrific explosion shook the neighborhood. Messick's barn had been blown to atoms. He is one of the special officers sworn in some time ago, and has been active in the apprehension of those who have been arrested for illicit liquor traffic. The barn contained nothing of special value. There is no clue to the perpetrator.







Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers.. such as a big snow storm, a favorite school teacher, a local happening, something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? It can be just a line or two or more if you wish. Your name won't be used unless you ask that it be. Send to tkforppe@yahoo.com and watch for it on a future TIME MACHINE posting!

Saturday, July 30, 2011

TIME MACHINE Preview ... The Wild, Wild East!

The TIME MACHINE takes a look at some rough and tumble times in Pocomoke City's past... this Sunday on The Pocomoke Public Eye!




Do you have a local memory to share with PPE readers.. such as a big snow storm, a favorite school teacher, a local happening, something of interest your parents or grandparents told you about? It can be just a line or two or more if you wish. Your name won't be used unless you ask that it be. Send to tkforppe@yahoo.com and watch for it on a future TIME MACHINE posting!

Thursday, July 28, 2011

TIME MACHINE Preview ... The Wild, Wild EAST!

There were some rough and tumble times in Pocomoke City's past.

The TIME MACHINE takes a look this Sunday on the Pocomoke Public Eye!

Sunday, July 24, 2011

TIME MACHINE

May, 1971

17-year-old Becky Culp was named Miss Pocomoke for 1971 with Peggy L. Richardson placing as first runner up in the annual competition sponsored by the Pocomoke Junior Woman's Club. Five-year-old Sharon Yvonne Daugherty was crowned Little Miss Pocomoke and Terri Anne Christian was runner up.


March, 1977

17-year-old Joy Laureen Dooling was crowned Miss Pocomoke 1977. First runner-up was 16-year-old Lisa Ellen Maddox, and her piano solo won her first place in the talent competition. 17-year-old Susan Patricia Reese was named Miss Congeniality. 5-year-old Tracy Lyn Worth was crowned Little Miss Pocomoke; 4-year-old Laura Lyn Santiano was first runner-up. The pageant was sponsored by the Junior Woman's Club and held in the Pocomoke High School auditorium.


July, 1977

Bob Frostrom of Pocomoke City drove his Porsche Carrera to victory in the "production" sports racing event at Summit Point Raceway in West Virginia in the Mid-Atlantic Road Racing Series.



For those who followed the postings this past week of the trial and verdict in the 1879 murder case against Lillie Duer of Pocomoke City an additional post-trial item was located.

TK for PPE


July, 1879

(Salt Lake Daily Tribune)

Thief as Well as Murderess

Miss Duer, who killed her school-mate and intimate friend in Maryland, and was recently acquitted of murder, has come to grief after all. Within a fortnight of her acquittal she had the enterprise to sell a sensational paper a novel entitled , "A Love Story: They Parted and Met Again". "By Miss Lillian Duer, lately on trial for the murder of Miss Ella Hearn." In the first installment of that romance she thus describes a death: "They had been boarding but for five months when her father was taken seriously ill. Medical aid proved of no avail. The baleful breath of death infused itself into his body and rendered it inanimate." This is certainly bad enough to be original, but now a Washington paper declares that the story, with slight changes, is copied from an English novel called "Catherine." So the sensational paper has lost its $500, and serves it right.



Footnote: A comment left to a previous posting on this case:

Anonymous said...

So if they had cable networks and tv back then do you think this would be like the Casey Anthony thing?


For sure.

Saturday, July 23, 2011

TIME MACHINE ... Preview For 7/24

Tomorrow the TIME MACHINE brings back a few items from the 1970's!

For those who have followed the accounts this past week of the trial and verdict in the 1879 murder case against Lillie Duer of Pocomoke City, I've located an additional post-trial item of interest which will be included.